An example of CSR: FaberCastell

Hello everybody,

this is my first post in a blog and I hope that I won’t any mistake. I don’t know if you liked the film, we watched this afternoon on climate change and sustainability, but I found it quiet interesting. Especially when they explained the way how cutting the rainforest influences our ecosystem and with that our life, it remembered me of what I have heard and read about the German pencil-making company FaberCastell. I think that many of you will know this company very well because it is a market leader in this field and operating globally. This company is probably one of the most ecological responsibly acting companies world wide because it has innovated his whole supply-chain in order to avoid cutting the rainforest to make its pencils. I was really impressed by their corporate sustainable strategy and thats why I want to share my knowledge about it with you:

Nearly 20 years ago FaberCastell started to think ecologically and they began to plant special pines in the Brasilian desert far away from the rain forest, a place which has been thought of as uncultivable before. 10 years after the first plantings, FaberCastell started to cut this trees in order to make their pencils but every time they cut a tree they immediately replant a new one. So they can assure a certaine stability in their wood supply without damaging the nature. Nowadays their artificially created forests have an extent of 10.000 hectars of land, provide a place to live for a huge number of different animals and are exciding even the wood demand of FaberCastell. For their ecological engagement FaberCastell also received several prices and awards. In case you want to read a bit more about FaberCastell’s strategy, you can go to the webpage http://www.csrgermany.de and you will find some background there concerning FaberCastell as well as other interesting corporate exemples of sustainable acting. But unfortunately this side is only available in German. Otherwise you can go to http://www.faber-castell.com.

If you know other interesting examples of CSR, please let me know, because I am very intersted in this topic. I believe that in order to survive in a long-term it is essential for a company to create new products or innovate processes, that are in harmony with nature. I hope you will post me back, so that we can engage in a good discussion about CSR.

Good evening everybody!

Sarah

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Posted in corporate sustainability
4 comments on “An example of CSR: FaberCastell
  1. shea08 says:

    Hi Sarah,

    If you want to check out another company that’s acting on social responsibility take a look at Bridgehead Coffeehouse. It’s a small Canadian company that was created by Oxfam in the 1980’s but just starting catching notice a few years ago. The business concept for the company is to allow coffee bean farmers in developing countries to gain fair access into international markets, so fair trade. Basically it’s operating as a Starbucks with a social conscience. It’s easily comparable to the Starbucks chain because the look and atmosphere in each shop is very similar… the only difference is that Bridgehead is actually benefiting international development.

    Personally I think the business concept for Bridgehead is a great idea, especially considering the success of the Starbucks brand. Bridgehead is a company that exemplifies the use of sustainable development as a competitive advantage. Although many Starbucks consumers are aware that the company is exploiting African villages to the point where some farmers can no longer feed their families, they continue to “vote with their wallets” and tell Starbucks that this is ok. I think a possible reason for this consumer loyalty could be the high class image associated with Starbucks coffee. By developing more or less all of Starbucks’ product/service offering, in addition to implementing a supply chain that favours fair trade products, I think Bridgehead has the long term potential to overcome Starbucks, which will ultimately increase its contributions to international sustainable development.

    At the moment Bridgehead only operates in two Canadian cities, Toronto and Ottawa, but I think it won’t be long before it grows nationally and internationally.

    Check it out if you like!
    http://www.bridgehead.ca

    Stefanie

  2. jeremy says:

    Thanks for this reference Sarah. You may like to provide a more detailed profile of this company in the “good, bad and the ugly” case study (module 4) later this week.

  3. jianzhou says:

    Procter & Gamble consists of over 138,000 employees working in over 80 countries worldwide. What began as a small, family-operated soap and candle company now provides products and services of superior quality and value to consumers in over 180 countries. The Procter & Gamble Company (NYSE: PG) has been awarded the “Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award for Designing Greener Chemicals” for 2009 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on behalf of the White House. I am wondering how sustainability be effectively mainstreamed across such a large and diverse company?

    Mainstreaming an aligned sustainability approach throughout a large global corporation with sufficient flexibility for different business units to make this a reality under their specific conditions is a significant challenge. It is key to make a sustainability strategy that is both effective and relevant/realistic for very different groups in the organisation. Some business units are more advanced than others. To achieve the SD goals everybody will have to perform and continuously improve. More information can found on its website.

    http://www.pg.com/en_US/index.shtml
    http://www.ethicalcorp.com/content.asp?ContentID=605

  4. Jess Dugdale says:

    Hi Sarah, I know this was a long time ago but I was wondering if you could upload the exact link from the German website? I can’t seem to find it and I am wondering if they have taken it down!

    Thanks,

    Jess 🙂

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