Egypt: The Gift of the Nile

For centuries Egyptian has used the Nile water for their daily use and agriculture. In the last few decades the increasing population of the Nile nations has put strain on the water supply. The problem is that many Nile nations especially Egypt may engage in a war to secure the water resources.

Egypt population is growing fast, by a new born every 27 second. The fast growing population is outgrowing the water and food supply. To help solve the food shortage problem the Egyptian government is expanding the amount of land available for agriculture by reclaiming more desert land, this expansion in agriculture land needs sustainable amount of water which is becoming problematic as the population increases and their demand for water increases.

The sources for water in Egypt are limited to the Nile River and underground water. The underground water in lots of wells is salted and not suitable for agriculture or drinking and needs to be processed which is capital intensive, a tool that Egypt lacks. The Nile River flows from Ethiopia to Egypt across multiple African countries. Each country has its own needs and growing agriculture projects to fulfill the needs of its people. An agreement was reached between these countries to divide the available water between them; this agreement is threatened to fail, as the need for water increases.

This dilemma raises the question: how long can Egypt sustain expanding its agriculture land?

I am sure that there are other countries in the same situation and trying to find a solution.

http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/3CA69161-7E03-447A-A969-D45023A6E315.htm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/454926.stm

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Posted in economic development, water
2 comments on “Egypt: The Gift of the Nile
  1. rtelmosse says:

    Good post. As a preamble, I feel that a new level of thinking is required – an “intelligent” water system could provide an answer. By first understanding the entire scope and nature of the Nile’s depletion, the leaders of those neighboring states can ensure that the right problem has been identified.

    From a political perspective, conditions have obviously changed since the first signing of the agreement. This looks like a good opportunity for a political and scientific community project to create intelligent and innovative solutions to meet the needs of the Niles’ “clients” and the communities that it services. What’s most important here is to have the right representatives around the table with a true, clear picture of the severity of the drinking water problem along the Nile.

    From a technology perspective, there are plenty of MNEs that provide services such as feasibility studies, best practice audits, and strategic master plans (for example). Naturally, one needs to address the water cycle in order to improve overall water quality. Also, efficient water desalination techniques do exist which would allow for consumption of salt water, not only from the Nile, but also from the Red and Mediterranean seas. (see Sea Water Desalination by Reverse Osmosis – http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/29535/technology_moving_toward_cheap_efficient.html )

    The answer to your question typically depends on how big of a water crisis you actually have, and not solely on the tensions that are mounting from thirsty communities.

    RT

  2. […] Egypt: The Gift of the NileThe fast growing population is outgrowing the water and food supply. To help solve the food shortage problem the Egyptian government is expanding the amount of land available for agriculture by reclaiming more desert land, …Sustainable Development & Competitive… – https://sdca.wordpress.com […]

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