From Trash to Fuel

In recent years, a Canadian company, from Québec, by the name of Enerkem has achieved what everyone dreamed to achieve: taking your non-recycling portion of your garbage and transforming it into ethanol.

This is a major breakthrough and there is a promising future for this application. This is a solution for recycling the “non-recyclable” portion of our waste and at the same time improving the eco-system efficiency, because this will take some pressure off the corn agriculture which produces ethanol and this will benefit both the population and the earth.

This new technology will have the advantage of taking some pressure off some waste site and as you can imagine, all of the big nations will want to have that technology in order to help them with their waste management.

The only interrogation that come to my mind with this technology, is since it will take care of or non-recyclable portion of or waste, what will be the pressure now on the governments and of the industries to build better product with the objective of Sustainable Development when they know that their waste now recyclable?

I am including the link of the company and an article on the construction of their first facility in Alberta

http://www.enerkem.com/index.php?module=CMS

http://cleantech.com/news/4482/enerkem-build-namericas-ethanol-waste

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Posted in energy
2 comments on “From Trash to Fuel
  1. angelabrazeau says:

    Plasco Energy Group Inc. which is based in Ottawa, Canada is also an example of a company that does waste conversion. They use technology to convert municipal, commercial and industrial waste into green power and other products such as fertilizer and potable water. You can learn more at http://www.plascoenergygroup.com/.

    This waste conversion method eliminates the need to transport garbage long distances and cuts down on emissions that are generated during this process. Plasco is an example of a private-public partnership because they work with government to establish their facilities. Plasco finances and builds the facility which means taxpayers do not have to pay for the service and in return, Plasco requires a guaranteed waste stream, sale of electricity and a location. I think more innovative initiatives such as this between government and the private sector could go a long way to establishing sustainable practices.

    Unfortunately, in May of this year, Plasco layed off 57 workers. Although their CEO says demand remains strong for the service, the current economic situation is affecting the company. http://www.ottawacitizen.com/business/fp/Ottawa+Plasco+lays+workers/1590126/story.html

  2. jeremy says:

    Applications of industrial ecology represent significant opportunities for ‘eco-preneurs’.

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